Monday, September 8, 2008

People of the Harlem Renaissance

Now that you have heard about and researched influential people of the Harlem Renaissance you should have knowledge of interesting facts or achievements of at least one person. Your assignment is to write a paragraph (4-5 sentences) about one of these interesting facts or achievements of a person from the Harlem Renaissance.

77 comments:

MsJackson said...

Josephine Baker was known for her energetic dancing and barely there clothing. She was the life of any party by walking into the room. Baker performed in the first African-American Broadway musical production "Shuffle Along." She also recorded numerous songs such as, "Afraid to Dream" and "After I Say I'm Sorry."

Ms. Jackson

Anonymous said...

Alice Dunbar-Nelson was known for writing short stories and dramas. "The goodness of St. Rocque and Other Stories" being one of her many books. In her books she talked about racism, color line and oppression. She also a field representative for the Women's Committee of the Council of Defense in 1918.

Isabella Mullins

Anonymous said...

James Van Der Zee was best known for the photos he took. He took photos of Billy Cosby and even Muhammad Ali. Other then that he was called 'The Eyes of Harlem' which meant he captured everyones thoughts and ideas. I would love to have that name. He took photos of anyone or anything he could get.

Tyler Johnson

Anonymous said...

Duke Ellington was considered the greatest jazz composer and bandleader. He was especially inspired by ragtime performers, and began to perform professionally when he was seventeen years old. On certain occasions he would record with other famous musicians who weren't entirely band members, such as Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, and Coleman Hawkins but also with later bop musicians John Coltrane and Charles Mingus. He continued to lead his band until he died of cancer in the year 1974.


Tyler Koester
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Zora Neale Hurston was known for her literary writings. Her most famous work is "Their Eyes Were Watching God". She also wrote a book called "Mules and Men". She co-founded "The Hilltop", the Howard University's school newspaper. She spent her last 10 years alive as a freelance writer for magazines and newspapers.

Peyton Weekly
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Bessie Smith was a popular singer in the 1920s. She was born in poverty and at a little age she performed on street corners to help her family get by and a local club owner offered her $8 a week to sing at his tavern. She soon was recognized by other blues singers and was starting to travel to places she could only dream of going to. She signed with Columbia Records and scored a major hit with "Down Hearted Blues" and "Gulf Coast Blues". She has over 150 recordings that followed and was well known. On her way back from a show in Tennessee, she was in a car acciddent and was rushed to a nearby hospital but soon to find out the place was only for "whites" so she died along the way trying to find the Afro-Hospital.

Lindsey Nhingsavath

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was one of the most important writers of the Harlem Renaissance and was considered one of the leading voice. His works helped shape American literature and politics. His poetry had amazing rhythme which is what his audience loved. Langston Hughes has earned a place among one of the greatest poets in America.

Iris Bocanegra

Anonymous said...

William "Count Basie" was a well known jazz pianist, organist, composer, and bandleader. Basie and his band recorded many songs, such as: "Jumpin' At the Woodside", "One O'Clock Jump", and "April in Paris" just to name a few. "One O'Clock Jump" and "April in Paris" became the theme songs for Count Basie and the Count Basie Orchestra. In 1984, The Carlton Theater in Red Bank, New Jersey was renamed the Count Basie Theater.

Danielle Doerr
5th Block

Anonymous said...

Count Basie was known for bringing jazz to Kansas City. He was a pianist with a very distinct style that people loved. He was even described as the "epitome of swing". He was a member of several famous orchestras and eventually organized his own. Their theme song was "One O'Clock Jump". He also recorded songs with several well-known vocalists such as Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughan and toured with Frank Sinatra in 1965.

Carlee McGuire
Block 1

Anonymous said...

Count Basie, born in Red Bank New Jersey, was a drummer turned pianist of the mid twentieth century. He is partly credited with bringing jazz and the big band sound to the midwest. He is viewed as one of the most influential musicians of his time. He died at the age of seventy nine in Hollywood Florida on August twentyfirst nineteen eightyfour.

Anonymous said...

The last blog was by Matt Holmes

Anonymous said...

Arna Bontemps was a phenominal writer who not only wrote for blacks, but he also wrote for white people. He wrote stories for young children while still in college, but as he grew older, his writings became more detailed, and he was one of the most important writers in the Harlem Renaissance. Most of his writings were published in popular racial magazines such as "The Crisis." Arna was looked upon with great respect.

Nicole Evans
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Zora Neale Hurston was a writer during and after the time of the Harlem Renaissance. She grew up in an all black community, so she was not exposed to racism much growing up. This caused her to have a very different view of life, which influenced her writing. Her most well known work is the novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God" although the book did not become popular untill after her death.

Nicole Stroda
block 5

Anonymous said...

Count Basie lived his life as a pianist, band leader, and jazz musician. He learned how to play the piano from his mother. He performed both swing and jazz. He is best know for his song "One O'clock Jump," and he was elected in the Down Beat Hall of Fame.

Rashelle Anderson
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was one of the most well known poets of the Harlem Renaissance. He was known for his racial pride which inspired many African American artists. He was proud of who he was and wanted others to be the same way. Hughes was first published in the magazine The Crisis. Two of his several famous poems are "The Negro Speaks of Rivers" and "The Weary Blues".

Stormie Colvin
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Billie Holiday was an influential and powerful jazz singer. Her life struggles and hardships inspired her to sing with more passion and move the audience. She was willing to stand for her beliefs when the controversy of "Strange Fruit" came about. She was a strong woman who took a bad situation and used it to help others.

Hannah Miller
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was an enthusiastic member of the Harlem Renaissance. Her ability to dance and sing the way she did had an amount of influence to an enormous amount of people. She has become known to wear the famous artifical banana skirt. Dancing around in public is a great way to become an inspiration
Amber Danielson
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Paul Robeson was a singer, actor, civil rights activist, law school graduate, athlete, scholar, and author. During his life Paul Robeson inspired thousands with his voice and acting career. Paul Robeson while on the stage was winning applause from critics and audiences, gaining an international reputation for his performances on the London stage. His stage presence was amazing and with the musical Show Boat and Shakespeare's Othello, Robeson's reputation grew even more. He won many awards but he is remembered for standing up for what is right.

Edna Valenzuela
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known and is remembered by her exotic dancing and skimpy clothing. Baker danced with the knowledge that she was unstoppable. Known for her jazz dances in Las Vegas, she also recorded songs such as "I Love My Baby" and "Dinah". Baker was also the first American woman to receive French military awards.

Sammi Boyajian
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known in Europe and America for her exotic dancing and skimpy clothing. She was put into adulthood at a young age of thirteen and already had two husbands by the age of fifteen. Baker was a star on Broadway as well as a singer. She was also the first African American woman to have French Military Honors at her funeral.

Lyndsey Horner

Anonymous said...

Nella Larsen was a African American who was very light skinned. She wrote 2 great novels Quicksand and Passing. Her first book was Quicksand which talked about motherhood and expresses race through the main character. The other novel Passing just talks about a light skinned African American who everyone thinks is white included her husband.

Jordan James
8th Block

Anonymous said...

Billie Holiday was a major part of the Harlem Renaissance. She was known for her soulful blues songs. She helped inspire others by the songs she sang. She sang about some very controversial things like lynchings, as shown in one of her most famous songs "Strange Fruit". Some of her other songs included "Lover Man" and "Don't Explain".

Anonymous said...

The above Billie Holiday blog is:
Kami Zahner
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Jean Toomer is best recognized for his novel, Cane. Cane is a mixture of poems, sketches, and short stories about black oppression. Toomer was of mixed race, so he tried to integrate himself with both races as much as possible and stay true to his heritage by writing these poems of hard times. He died in 1967 having influenced many famous writers and poets, such as Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes.

-Tressa Lee
Block 2

Ben Anderson said...

Josephine Baker, a.k.a. "The Black Pearl" was essentially the Renaissance woman. She was a rounded artist in dance and music. Recording her first music tracks in 1926, she had already made history in Europe and America with her, at the time, peculiar dance style. And for her efforts in gathering intelligence for the French military (whatever that is) she was the first American woman to be granted French Military Honors at her funeral.

Anonymous said...

Arna Bontemps was a man known for his many works of literature. He was considered the authority during the Harlem renassiance and the a core piece of the New Negro movement. He was one of the first authors to write for both black and white audiences. His many childrens bookds such as "You Can't Pet a Possum." were huge successes. He also wrote more serous novels using documentations from the past, insighting the histories of black culture. His last piece of works were books of poems he had edited with Langston Hughes.

Rebekah Gates
Block 5
9/18/08

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was one of the most famous black poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Not only did he write poetry, but he also explored several other areas of writing. Hughes wrote novels, plays, lyrics, magazine columns, poetry, short stories, and more. His first published poem, and one of his most famous is "The Negro Speaks of Rivers." Hughes was a role model to African Americans, and caused many black poets to follow his lead.

Erica Johnson
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was the most influential and fervent writer/poet in the Harlem Renaissance.He paved the path for many other writers past and present. His smooth poems and influential writings shaped the people living in the Harlem Renaissance from impoverished blacks, to proud americans.

Phoebe Janssen
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Zora Neale Hurston was known for novels. She was born in 1891, and died in 1960. Her most famous novel is "Their Eyes Were Watching God." She wrote several other novels including "Mules and Men." Her famous quote is "jump at de sun," her explaination was the you might not land on the sun but you would get off the ground.

Nathan Laskowski
5th Block

Anonymous said...

Jean Toomer was an Afrian American poet, novelists, and a important figure of the Harlem renaissance.He was best known for his novel"Cane" which talks about the experices of being black in America. Toomer is also known for writing short stories as well.He was inspired by other black poetas who were a big part in the Harlem renaissance.

Brie'Aunna King
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Jean Toomer was known mainly for his writing of Cane. Not only was he a writer, he also went through a tough journey to get where he was. All through his childhood Toomer went from 3 different segragated and non-segragated schools. Jean Toomer also went to 6 higher institution schools! Later on in life Mr. Toomer did get married, had a kid, and lived a happier life.

Alex Lawrence
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known for her lively dancing and barely there clothing but did anyone know that Josephine Baker served with the French Red Cross during WWII? When France fell in 1940 she became active in the French resistance. Using her career as a cover she was able to become a spy. And because she was a celebrity she was allowed to travel much more freely then most other people during that time. Baker also used her charisma to influence foreign consulates to process visas for contacts, some of who traveled with her as a cover.

CJ Shafer

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known for her exotic dancing and her clothes that were barely there. Her nickname was the "Black Pearl." Josephine Baker ran away at the age of thirteen. She had five husbands. She married her second husband at the age of fifteen! Baker was the first American woman to recieve awards from the French military.

Anna Brand
Block 2

Anonymous said...

William “Count” Basie was one of the leading figures in the swing era of jazz. Some of his works include, “One O’Clock Jump”, “ April in Paris”, “Jumpin’ at the Woodside”, and “Splanky” just to name a few. “One O’Clock Jump” and “ April in Paris” became known as the theme songs for Count Basie and his band, and Basie also made a few movie appearances in movies such as Cinderfella(1960) and Blazing Saddles(1974) playing “ April in Paris”. Count Basie was often described as the “epitome of swing”, and in 1984 The Carlton Theater in Red Bank, New Jersey was renamed to be the Count Basie Theater.


http://search.playlist.com/tracks/splanky


Lauren Brown
blk.1

Anonymous said...

Gwendolyn B. Bennett was known for her very strong poetry and short stories. She was most known for "Hatred", "Lines Written at the Grave of Alexandre Dumas", "Secret", "Nocturne" and her famous short story, "Wedding Day". She was the assistant to the editor for the Opportunity and had her own column called "The Ebony Flute".

Emma Jordan
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Billie Holiday was a powerful and influential jazz singer in the 1930's. "What A Little Moonlight Can Do" and "Miss Brown To You" were the songs that helped establish Holiday as a major vocalist. Her harsh childhood helped her to become a strong, passionate singer whose songs were ment to entertain, move, and help others.

Lauren Barton
Block 1

Anonymous said...

Without James Van Der Zee the Harlem Renaissance may not have been seen through the eyes of an amazing photographer. After he learned some fundamentals on photography he opened his own studio in Harlem. Van Der Zee took pictures of African Americans of all social classes. Later in life he retired and went into poverty when the Metropolitan Museum of Art created an exhibit called "Harlem on the Mind" reintroducing Van Der Zee into the attention of society and winning him awards. After that he took up photography again until his death. I think without James Van Der Zee the Harlem Renaissance would not have been seen the same way.


-Kaitlyn Jurgens
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was an amazing writer. He wrote a wide variety of poems, stories, columns, novels, and plays. He was very influential and was one of important people of the Harlem Renaissance. Without him, the Harlen Renaissance would not be complete!

- Kelsey Gatewood
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Jean Toomer was an American short story writer, poet, and essayist. He was of mixed ethnicity and could pass as either white or black. He attended six universities and studied many things that motivated him to start writing. After graduation he sought to live not as a member of any racial group but as an American. He showed this when his book, Cane, was considered a masterpiece of African-American literature and he was angered. He declared his work to be a depiction of American experience written by an American author, not a black one.

Kylie Wooten
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Duke Ellington was known for his influential jazz music. Duke started his music career at the age 7, playing the piano. At the age 15 he was writing music. Duke Ellington started his own jazz band and soared off from there. The Duke then later died in 1974, losing his battle with cancer. Duke Ellington will still be known to be the greatest Jazz composer of the Harlem Renaissance.

*Kyle Pacheco*

Anonymous said...

Alain Locke was known for his theory of cultural pluralism, which is having values for different styles in a socitey. More than any other African-American during the Harlem Renaissance, he encouraged black authors to set high artistic standards in their views on life. Graduating second in his high school class and attending Harvard University, he was a very wise editor. Some of his most famous writing were, "The New Negro" and "The Negro in America."

Anonymous said...

Alain Locke was known for his theory of cultural pluralism, which is having values for different styles in a socitey. More than any other African-American during the Harlem Renaissance, he encouraged black authors to set high artistic standards in their views on life. Graduating second in his high school class and attending Harvard University, he was a very wise editor. Some of his most famous writing were, "The New Negro" and "The Negro in America."

Tommy Brady
Block 5

PS- The one above this one is mine, i forgot to put my name :)

Anonymous said...

James Weldon Johnson was a very influential poem in the early 1900's. One of his most famous works is "Lift Every Voice and Sing". He had originaly wrote this poem for a presentation celebrating Abraham Lincoln. With the help of this brother, John Rosamond Johnson, it was composed into a song. It is now known too many as "The Negro National Anthem".

Gabby Dellinger
2nd Block

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was known for writing poems. He wrote poems about what he saw in the black community. He worked on a freighter and lived in France from 1922-1924. He then came back and started writing poems and novels.

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was known for writing poems. He wrote poems about what he saw in the black community. He worked on a freighter and lived in France from 1922-1924. He then came back and started writing poems and novels.


Damien Flager

Anonymous said...

Ms. A'Lelia Walker is widely known for inspiring some of the most famous artists from Harlem Renaissance. Artist sch as, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Carl Van Vechten. Mr. Hughes named her "joy goddess of Harlem's 1920's" and "queen of the night."

~Brenda Njogu
~Block 1st

Anonymous said...

Billie Holiday was a very powerful and motivated jazz singer in the 1930's. She is known for singing about her struggles in life. Her song Strange Fruit was about the lynching and discrimination faced during her time. She greatly influenced the african american community with her wonderful lyrics.

Josh Lentz

Anonymous said...

Paul Laurence Dunbar was one of the first African-American poets. He wrote poems, essays, novels and short stories. He died when he was 33 of depression because of a divorce. He was known for his colorful language and use of dialect. He was the Editor of his school's paper. Some of his books were: "Oak and Ivy," "Majors and Minors."

--Kaylee Champagne
--8th Block

Anonymous said...

Jean Toomer was known for his novel "Cane" and poetry. He wrote one of the most influencial books of the Harlem Renaissance. Toomer was one of the first to write a modern novel during the Harlem Renaissance. He showed the truth of renaissance in all his writings.
Katie Daniels
block 5

Anonymous said...

W.E.B. Dubois was a very influential person of the Harlem Renaissance. He was the first African American to graduate with a Phd from Harvard, as well as the founder of the NAACP. He was a major civil rights activist, and this is showed through his co-founding of the Niagra movement. He also wrote nany novels including "the Philadelphia Negro".

Bailey Pfeifer

Anonymous said...

Alice Dunbar Nelson was known for writing many short novels, and poems. Her short stories were written about racism, and segregation. Her best known works were "The Sonnet". She attended college and was a school teacher before she became a writer.

Haley Sheldon
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Count Basie was a well-known person of the swing era in jazz. As a young boy he studied piano with his mother. Then he grew to become an American jazz organist, bandleader, pianist, and composer. The Count Basie Orchestra was led by Basie for almost 50 years. "One O'clock Jump" and "Jumpin' At the Woodside" are a couple of Basie's songs famous in the Harlem Renaissance.


Victoria Insogna
8th Block

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was important to the Harlem Renaissance because she brought joy to all who say her. She was born Freda Josephine McDonald and married her second husband at the age of fifteen, who's name she decided to keep. Josephine adopted twelve children who she called "the rainbow tribe" becaus ethey were of all different heritage. Her greatest impact was that she refused to condone segregation and would only perform in places that allowed both people of color and whites.

Daphne Whittaker
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known for her exotic outfits. Her trademark was a leopard on a leash, a skirt made of feathers and a dance in witch she wore a string of bananas and not much else. In 1925 Josephine Baker moved to Paris as part of the La Revue Negre. Josephine Baker was so successful in Paris she stayed and opened her own night club.

Paige Winters
Block 1

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known for her exotic outfits. Her trademark was a leopard on a leash, a skirt made of feathers and a dance in witch she wore a string of bananas and not much else. In 1925 Josephine Baker moved to Paris as part of the La Revue Negre. Josephine Baker was so successful in Paris she stayed and opened her own night club.

Paige Winters
Block 1

Anonymous said...

Josephine Baker was known for her exotic outfits. Her trademark was a leopard on a leash, a skirt made of feathers and a dance in witch she wore a string of bananas and not much else. In 1925 Josephine Baker moved to Paris as part of the La Revue Negre. Josephine Baker was so successful in Paris she stayed and opened her own night club.

Paige Winters
Block 1

David Luker said...

Count Basie was concidered the leading jazz artist, along with Duke Ellington. He was known for his swing dance-inducing songs and his song "One O'Clock Jump". He studied the piano with his mother and shortly soon after he studied, informally, with Fats Waller. He toured with many different singers, but was mostly known for playing with Frank Sinatra. Before he died, he put extensve time into his autobiography.

David Luker
Block 8

Ethan Platt 8th Block said...

Gwendolyn B Bennett was known for her outstonding peotry and short stories. Her stories were constantly in Fire!! and Oppornity. Some of her most famous would include "wedding day" and her column "The Ebony Flute".

Anonymous said...

Alice Dunbar Nelson was a woman that achieved many things during the Harlem renaissance. Not only did she write short stories, she was also a field representative for the Woman's Committee of the Council of Defense. Her poems were published in a famous magazine during the Harlem renaissance, Crisis. Last, but certainly not the least, she campaigned for the passage for the Dyer Anti-Lynching Bill.

Jalisa Brice

Anonymous said...

James Van Der Zee was sometimes referred to as the "Eyes of Harlem." An African American coined this term when observing the way he captured the thoughts of the townspeople during the Harlem Renaissance. He is also famous for the first use of Photo-montage. Montage is blending two photographs together. Stars such as, Muhammad Ali and Bill Cosby were eager to obtain his works. Brett Jensen

Anonymous said...

Paul Laurence Dunbar was a great African American poet. He also was a writer of essays, novels and short stories. He was inspired by his mother when he was little. By reading news letters when he was little. He died at the age of 33 of a great depression after his wife divorced him.

Thomas Speers
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Jean Toomer was most known for his novel "Cane" although he wrote various other poetry as well. "Cane" is widely considered by critics to be his best work. It has affected future generations of writers with its nontraditional composition. After "Cane" Toomer found it harder to get published and gradually withdrew from society although he continued to write.

Nicholas Dodson

Anonymous said...

Arna Bontemps was a writer in the Harlem Renaissance. He was a very accomplished writer among other things. Bontemps was lucky enough to have the play A Tuesday Morning Ride based on his short story "A Summer Tragedy". He was an influential man that is remembered by most as a good writer of children's books.

Heather Pearson 2nd Block

Anonymous said...

Billie Holiday, also know as Lady Day, was an influential jazz singer/song writer. A critic wrote, "She changed the art of American pop vocals forever." She lived with her mother, Sadie Fagan, mostly in Baltimore, where she was employed in a brothel. She was later arrested for prostitution. After getting started with her jazz career, she became addicted to heroin, which is what most-likely killed her. She died at age 44.

Paige Wright
1st Block

Anonymous said...

Alain Locke was known for his theory of cultural pluralism, which is having values for different styles in a socitey. He encouraged black authors to set high artistic standards in their depictions of life during the Harlem Renaissance. Locke was very intelligent, going to Harvard, Oxford, and many other schools. Some of his most famous writings were, "The New Negro" and "The Negro in America."

Kayla Cissell
Block 5

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was one of the best known writers during the Harlem Renaissance. His first publication of poems was "The Weary Blus." His works were very inspring for people at the time. His poems also helped inspire other people's writings. Langston Hughes was argueably the most famous writer in the Harlem Renaissance.

Alex Knorr
Block 8

Anonymous said...

William "Count" Basie was Widely regarded as one of the most important jazz bandleaders of his time. Basie introduced several generations of listeners to the Big Band sound and left an influential catalogue of music. some of his most popular songs include, "Ain't Misbehaven", One O'Clock Jump", and, "April in Paris". One of Count Basie's lesser known songs and my favorite is "Splanky".

(http://search.playlist.com/tracks/Count%20Basie)

Lindsey Brown
Block 2

Anonymous said...

Nella Larsen was a famous biracial female author known for addressing various issues of African American women such as race, sexuality, and social class. She used her own life as inspiration for her novels which featured biracial characters searching for their identity. Her two novels are "Quicksand" and "Passing", which are considered two of the best fictions written in the 1920's. Her other accomplishments include being the first African-American woman to recieve a Guggenheim fellowship for creative writing.

Carley Lintz
Block 8

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. Hughes is known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance.On May 22, 1967, Hughes died from complications after abdominal surgery, related to prostate cancer, at the age of 65.

Kennedy Mwachia

Anonymous said...

Gwendolyn B. Bennett was an accomplished African American writer that greatly influenced the Opportunity. She was very skilled in poetry and prose and is probably best known for her short story "Wedding Day". Other works include "Heritage", "Nocturne",and "Wind" She influenced Harlem in many ways including serving as a member of the Harlem Artists Guild and leading the Harlem Community Arts Center.


Jordan Keehn

Anonymous said...

Alice Dunbar-Nelson wrote short stories and dramas. A few of them would be "Little Miss Sophie," and "A Carnival Jangle." These are just a few of the stories she wrote. Many of her short stories and dramas were rejected because of the content. Her main focuses in her books were oppression and racism.

Blk 8
Katie Allen

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughes was mainly known for being one of the most important writers of the Harlem Renaissance.
In his time he wrote sixteen books of poems and several other short stories and novels. One of Hughes' famous poems was "The Negro Speaks of Rivers." He was one of the best Poets in America.


Jordan Myers
Block 1

P.S. I was planning on doing this yesterday but our home computer was down. My mom will be happy to confirm.

Anonymous said...

Langston Hughs
Langston Hughs was very important to the harlem renaissance because of his poetry. His poetry was very influental on the harlem renaissance and on several literary works afterwords. His poetry helped shape African American culture. He helped the world see how beautiful black culture truly is.

Zachary Goddard
Hour 1

Josh Moore said...

Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was a well-known big band pianist during the Harlem Renaissance. He had his own orchestra that toured all over Europe and the United States. One song that he recorded later on in his career was Black, Brown, and Beige was very influential in the Harlem Renaissance as it portrayed his views on the difficulties of the African Americans of the time.

Josh Moore

Anonymous said...

Count Basie was one of the most important jazz leaders. Was also big in Kansas City, joining the band called the Blue Devils. Basie's band theme song was "One O'Clock Jump". He has been viewed to be one of the most influential musicians.

Camber York

Anonymous said...

Poem: If We Must Die
Author: Claude McKay
The poem is a statement about fighting back and finishing strong even through defeat. A man who wished to go nobly said this seemingly to convince his fellow kinsman to do the same against thier murderous agressors. The pupose was to inspire his nobility and bravery so that his kin can be remebered as the ones who went down without a fight against dogs, not like them. It is a sad toned poem, depressing and inspiring because of the courage of the group through failure. The message of the poem is to show bravery in the face of defeat and go out with a bang. One that you will be remebered by so that you will not be forgotten as something little.

REBEKAH GATES
BLK. 5